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This should be an easy question to answer, right? You’re the boss, so you’re steering the ship!

But there’s a good chance that when I listen to you, I’m hearing you mention a lot of other people. The employee who called in sick. Those customers who just keep demanding. The weather. The government.

I get it, I really do. It feels like I’m just a tiny boat on the water, at the mercy of anything and everything.

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We all struggle with the idea of when to change and how much. And when you’re leading a team of people, everything you do is magnified in impact – both positive and negative.

But there’s a key which helps give you some direction.

Know your foundation.

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Some industries are getting more nervous.

Tariffs. Wars. Interest rates. Softer consumer confidence.

The question is what you choose to do with all this swirling information. Because it’s always something. If you want a reason to avoid committing to a decision, there’s always something you can blame it on.

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I heard an interesting article on the Innovation Hub radio show recently, talking about how riskiness affects people’s decisions. It got me thinking, because I’ve wondered for many years about the connection.

When we’re working on connecting our products and marketing to the customer need, we often start with their needs and desires. The customer desires a phone which is functional and attractive, with long battery life and easy-to-use apps.

That’s fine as far as it goes, but it’s a pretty surface-level way of thinking.

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We’ve all been learning things during our entire lives. That’s called experience, and it’s what helps you build valuable skills and teach others.

But wisdom is more subtle than just stuff you know.

It’s about putting choices into a larger context: namely, your values. And the values of the larger community you operate within.

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Several weeks ago I started by talking about what it means to be a leader in a VUCA world. That’s Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, and Ambiguous. Something we can all relate to.

I’ve replaced the letters with four key principles which help us to navigate through this instability. V was Values, U was Uplift, C was Commitment, now A is … Action.

Because it’s all just good theory and interesting discussion if it doesn’t turn into action.

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For the last couple of weeks, I’ve been talking about our unstable VUCA world: Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, and Ambiguous. I’m replacing each letter with something which helps us to navigate even though we feel uncomfortable.

V was for Values, U was for Uplift, and C is for … Commitment.

Because getting through difficult times takes fortitude. Commitment.

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I started talking last week about the acronym VUCA: Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, and Ambiguous. I’m sure we can all relate to how this describes the world that each of our organizations live in.

I’m offering a replacement for VUCA which tells us how to navigate through all this instability. V was for Values, U is for … Uplift.

That’s because one of the biggest issues we’re dealing with is fear and morale.

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In 1987, Warren Bennis and Burt Nanu created the term VUCA to describe the leadership challenges created from a world which was increasingly Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, and Ambiguous. It became more popular because the acronym captured some of the tension that people were feeling in many industries and organizations.

There’s no question that most of us are experiencing this.

How do we deal with it? In the coming weeks, I’ll introduce you to a replacement VUCA which leads you to constructive action. It starts with Values.

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The work is never done. Ever.

It’s a fact of our modern life, really. And I’m sure you feel this in your business; there’s an infinite supply of stuff to be done and things to worry about.

The question is, though: What really matters?

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