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It’s become quite the thing to identify people as Extraverts or Introverts. And now Ambiverts, and I’ve heard “I’m an Extravert with Introvert tendencies.”

It’s almost as if these terms didn’t really mean much anyway.

Let’s face it, these are tendencies that we learn as we grow up. To some degree they might be innate, but most of it is learned from our families and friends. It’s not like the color of our eyes, which is controlled by genetics.

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Two years ago, I had a wonderful plan for building my coaching business in 2020. For some strange reason, that all got messed up!

I’m blessed that my coaching can instantly switch over to Zoom. In fact, I’ve been using that for all my remote clients for many years now.

No, my marketing strategy got totally derailed. Since my approach is heavily based on building one-on-one relationships, most of my networking instantly disappeared. Some groups fell apart while others stagnated or were forced to redesign.

Since I have a tech background and have lots of experience with Zoom, I got pulled into producing Zoom events for various organizations. It turns out that can pay pretty well, so I ended up getting some significant revenue for that in 2020. Some of it continued into 2021.

Along the way, I discovered something fascinating. It turns out that clients are drawn to my production work because I take a coaching approach to it. I focus on their deeper goals, and help them design an event which truly achieves that. Sure, along the way I need to cajole Zoom into working properly, but many people can do that.

I’ve also been told that my coach-like optimism is a real asset. It helps my clients to approach their event calmly, knowing that somehow the tech magic will happen behind the scenes and all their participants will get a lot out of it.

But the lesson here isn’t really about Zoom, or pivoting my business in response to the pandemic.

It’s about how I’ve learned to bring the coaching mindset to everything I do. Looking back on my life, I see many examples of how that thinking has served me well as facilitator, leader, volunteer, and parent.

As I look to the future, it appears that we all need to strengthen our skills in being flexible and adapting. Key forces might be health care, climate change and industry upheaval – or other new influences we haven’t yet seen. But it doesn’t seem like things will become stable anytime soon.

It turns out that coaches are well suited to navigate this space. We’re all about balancing the power of a vision with the reality of the present. We look for resources and capabilities, building on strengths and synergies.

I have no idea if the future belongs to coaches. What matters is that we help bring the coaching skills and mindset to more people in our society: leaders, collaborators, and problem-solvers.

It doesn’t mean that we coaches know any more about having solutions or what our future will look like. Most of the time we’re probably as lost and confused as anyone else.

What makes the difference is our optimism and confidence that we can, together, build a better future. We believe that problems can be solved. We believe that people are fully capable of achieving ambitious goals. We believe that every person is to be included and respected.

Those beliefs seem to be in short supply sometimes.

That’s why coaches and coaching skills are so vital to the future of our world!


This article was first published in Choice Magazine, Volume 21 number 1.

What does “entrepreneur” mean to you? It’s probably as simple as someone who launches a new company.

Fair enough. But it’s a lot more interesting than that.

As I’ll be discussing at the Soulful Entrepreneur Summit in January 2022, being an entrepreneur is really a mindset which can serve anyone.

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NO DOUBT YOU SPENT many years in this classroom situation. Sit up. Pay attention. Take notes. Be quiet.

And there will be a test in a few weeks.

I’m not a fan of this model for adult learners like you and me. Why? Because it ignores the fact that the best learning is active collaboration.

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THERE SEEMS TO BE A HUGE DISCONNECT between how older people define “career” versus younger people.

This was well articulated by the author of 50 Ways to Get a Job, Dev Aujila. In a recent interview, he spoke of stability based jobs versus skill based jobs. He was speaking to job seekers, but business leaders have a lot to learn from this.

My parents grew up with the model that success looks like having one employer and one career for your entire working life. That model was already breaking down in the 1970s, and now it’s rarely effective.

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